Scientific Frontline® On-Site Search Engine by Google Co-op

Current UTC Time
 
News Home, where you will find the "Current Top Stories"The Communication Center contains current news briefs from major Universities, NASA, ESA, and the top three Aviation Mfg.Science section contains all the latest knowledge in Medical Research, Archeology, Biology, and other General Science NewsCurrent Earth Science and Environmental discoveries.The E.A.R., Environmental Awareness Report. E.A.R. will keep you advised of Environmental Alerts, Government, University, and public projects. All the current space discoveries from Hubble, Spitzer, Chandra X-Ray, ESO, Gemini, Subaru, ESA, NASA, and many more. The latest in space theories from leading astronomers and scientist from around the world.The Space Weather Forecast Center by Scientific Frontline, Current up-to-date space weather, forecasts, alerts and warnings. Images from SOHO, GOES, and STEREO. Plus solar observations from Erika RixCurrent space missions newsThe Cassini Main Page. Containing all the latest news from the Cassini Spacecraft around Saturn. Leading into Cassini status reports, The Cassini Gallery of all the latest images from Cassini. Seeing Saturn and all her moons like never before.Daily Sky maps, Celestial Events Calendar.The Stellar Nights  Gallery, An amateur astronomical collection from John Crilly, Richard Handy, Erika Rix, and Paul RixCloudy Nights Telescope Reviews / An Atronomical Community.The latest in Computer, Nanotechnology, and General Technological advancements.The latest in Aviation achievements in civil, military, and space aviationThe World News Report,  news from the Voxant Viral Syndication, known as the Newsroom. Contains the latest videos from major news sources.The news archive from Scientific Frontline's past articles. A world of knowledge at your fingertips.Abstracts, Journals, and Technical papers maintained by Scientific Frontline. The Gateway to all the galleries in the Scientific Frontline collectionThe Scientific Frontline IYA 2009 CoverageResearch Department | Staff and Researchers OnlySite Related links from major universities, government and private research labs.Assorted Downloads related to space, science, aviation, including screensavers and ASTROMONY SOFTWARE, and other endorsed programs.Words from Heidi-Ann Kennedy, Director Scientific FrontlineThe foundation of an online publication by SFL ORG. News Network called Scientific FrontlineContact page to Scientific Frontline / SFL ORG. News NetworkDisclaimer / Legal Notice for use of the SFL ORG. News Network's publication Scientific Frontline
an online publication of the SFL ORG. Educational News Network

Billion-Year Revision of Plant Evolution Timeline

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Hi-Res Version
Like many land plants, this red seaweed produces lignin, a primary component of wood.

Credit: Kathy Ann Miller / UBC
Land plants’ ability to sprout upward through the air, unsupported except by their own woody tissues, has long been considered one of the characteristics separating them from aquatic plants, which rely on water to support them.

Now lignin, one of the chemical underpinnings vital to the self-supporting nature of land plants – and thought unique to them – has been found in marine algae by a team of researchers including scientists at UBC and Stanford University.

Lignin, a principal component of wood, is a glue-like substance that helps fortify cell walls and is instrumental in the transport of water in many plants.

In a study published in today’s issue of the journal Current Biology, lead author Patrick Martone and colleagues  describe using powerful chemical and microscopic anatomy techniques to identify and localize lignin within cell walls of a red alga that thrives along the wave-swept California coast. Martone conducted the work described in the paper while a graduate student and postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of co-author Mark Denny, Professor of Biology at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station.

All land plants evolved from aquatic green algae and scientists have long believed that lignin evolved after plants took to land as a mechanical adaptation for stabilizing upright growth and transporting water from the root,” says Martone, an assistant professor in the UBC Dept. of Botany, where he is continuing his work on lignin.

Because red and green algae likely diverged more than a billion years ago, the discovery of lignin in red algae suggests that the basic machinery for producing lignin may have existed long before algae moved to land.”

Alternatively, algae and land plants may have evolved the identical compound independently, after they diverged.

The pathways, enzymes and genes that go into making this stuff are pretty complicated, so to come up with all those separately would be really, really amazing,” says Denny. “Anything is possible, but that would be one hell of a coincidence.”

The team’s finding provides a new perspective on the early evolution of lignified support tissues – such as wood – on land, since the seaweed tissues that are most stressed by waves crashing on shore appear to contain the most lignin, possibly contributing to mechanical support, says Martone.

The new discovery may affect one of the ways land plants are distinguished from aquatic algae in textbooks – by the presence of lignin. It is also of interest to biofuel researchers since lignin binds cell walls and prevents the extraction of cellulose, a key component in biofuel production.

Funded primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy, Martone says the research team has started looking for billion-year-old lignin genes that might be shared among land plants and red algae, and has started exploring whether lignin exists in other aquatic algae and what role it plays in the evolution and function of aquatic plants.

Source: University of British Columbia

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Scientific Frontline®
RSS Feeds

Scientific Frontline®
The Comm Center
The E.A.R.®
World News Report
Stellar Nights®
Cassini Gallery
Mars Gallery
Missions Gallery
Observatories Gallery
Observatories Gallery
Space Weather Alerts
Events
Directors Chair

Scientific Frontline®
Is supported in part by “Readers Like You”
Scientists Identify Bacteria That Increase Plant Growth Research Uncovers Surprising Lion Stronghold in War-Torn Central Africa Fish Diversity May Be Key to Recovery of Coral Reefs Navigate Back or Forward Through Earth Science News, Related Page or Pick an Article From The News Ticker.


Scientific Frontline®, Stellar Nights®, E.A.R.®, and Environmental Awareness Report®”
Are Registered Trademarks of the
Online Publication of the SFL ORG. Educational News Network
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma USA
A Not-for-Profit Educational News Service
© 2005 - 2009 All Rights Reserved


Home | Comm. Center | Science | Earth Science | Space | Space Weather Center | Aviation | Technology | Galleries | About Us | Contact Us | Site Map | FAQ