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Kepler Mission

Kepler Mission
Title : Kepler Mission
Description :

Overview of the Kepler Mission


Importance of Planet Detection



The centuries-old quest for other worlds like our Earth has been rejuvenated by the intense excitement and popular interest surrounding the discovery of giant planets like Jupiter orbiting stars beyond our solar system. With the exception of the pulsar planets, all of the extrasolar planets detected so far are gas giants, approximately 150 as of 2005. The challenge now is to find terrestrial planets (habitable planets like Earth), which are 30 to 600 times less massive than Jupiter.



The Kepler Mission, a NASA Discovery mission, is specifically designed to survey our region of the Milky Way galaxy to detect and characterize hundreds of Earth-size and smaller planets in or near the habitable zone. The habitable zone encompasses the distances from a star where liquid water can exist on a planet's surface.



Results from this mission will allow us to place our solar system within the continuum of planetary systems in the Galaxy.



Kepler Mission Scientific Objective:



The scientific objective of the Kepler Mission is to explore the structure and diversity of planetary systems. This is achieved by surveying a large sample of stars to:



   1. Determine the percentage of terrestrial and larger planets there are in or near the habitable zone of a wide variety of stars;



   2. Determine the distribution of sizes and shapes of the orbits of these planets;



   3. Estimate how many planets there are in multiple-star systems;



   4. Determine the variety of orbit sizes and planet reflectivities, sizes, masses and densities of short-period giant planets;



   5. Identify additional members of each discovered planetary system using other techniques; and



   6. Determine the properties of those stars that harbor planetary systems.



The Kepler Mission also supports the objectives of future NASA Origins theme missions Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) and Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF),



    * By identifying the common stellar characteristics of host stars for future planet searches,



    * By defining the volume of space needed for the search and



    * By allowing SIM to target systems already known to have terrestrial planets.





The Transit Method of Detecting Extrasolar Planets:



When a planet crosses in front of its star as viewed by an observer, the event is call a transit. Transits by terrestrial planets produce a small change in a star's brightness of about 1/10,000 (100 parts per million, ppm), lasting for 2 to 16 hours. This change must be absolutely periodic if it is caused by a planet. In addition, all transits produced by the same planet must be of the same change in brightness and last the same amount of time, thus providing a highly repeatable signal and robust detection method.



Once detected, the planet's orbital size can be calculated from the period (how long it takes the planet to orbit once around the star) and the mass of the star using Kepler's Third Law of planetary motion. The size of the planet is found from the depth of the transit (how much the brightness of the star drops) and the size of the star. From the orbital size and the temperature of the star, the planet's characteristic temperature can be calculated. From this the question of whether or not the planet is habitable (not necessarily inhabited) can be answered. 


Credit : NASA
Source : NASA


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